WE'D WELCOME YOUR FEEDBACK
You have been selected to participate in a brief customer satisfaction survey to let us know how we can improve your experience.
The survey is designed to measure your entire experience, please look for it at the conclusion of your visit. It will be open in a new window.

Aviation Classics - Issue 24 - Shackleton

Issue 24 - Shackleton
Hover mouse over image to zoom.
Issue 24 - Shackleton
Issue 24 - Shackleton


Purchase a Print Copy
£5.00 (Approx $6.10 or €5.80)
Out of Stock

Purchase a Digital Copy
£5.99 (Approx $7.31 or €6.95)
Share this with a family member or friend?
Click on one of the buttons below:

Issue 24 of Aviation Classics looks at the Avro Shackleton – a tough maritime patrol aircraft that entered service with the Royal Air Force in 1951 and was to growl its way across the oceans of the world for an unprecedented 40 years. 

 

The Shackleton was powered by four Rolls-Royce Griffons driving 13ft diameter contra-rotating propellers, the inner propeller turning clockwise when seen from the rear, the forward propeller turning in the opposite direction. 

 

Once again edited by Tim Callaway, who has a broad aviation pedigree, this issue of Aviation Classics comprises the publication’s now established quality mix of features and photographs. This 132 page glossy A4 perfect bound ‘bookazine’ will look at how:

 

  • The unusual noise the engines made gave rise to the nickname of ‘The Growler’, which appropriately is the name of the magazine of the Shackleton Association. 
  • The design was a development of the Avro Lincoln bomber, itself being derived from the wartime Avro Lancaster
  • The requirement of the Shackleton began during the Second World War, where a number of bomber aircraft had been modified to provide long range cover to the vital transatlantic convoys in the five year battle against the threat of German U-boats.
  • The first Shackleton MR Mk.1s were delivered to 120 Squadron on March 30, 1951, the last was not to retire until the AEW Mk.2s of 8 Squadron were replaced by the Boeing E-3D Sentry in 1991. 


Other magazines you may like...